Celestial Cycles

The summer solstice is longest day and shortest night of the year. It's revered by ancient cultures all around the world and always a good excuse for a bike adventure

17 Jun 2015  |  Posted by Jack Thurston  |  Categories: Correspondence, Events, Friends, Monthly highlights, Stories, Travel & Adventure Cycling, Urban Cycling

Long before the festivals of Christmas, Easter, Hanukkah, Ramadan or Thanksgiving came along human kind measured its progress through the year by observing the sun and the stars. The solstices are the pair of celestial bookends that mark the longest day of summer and the deepest depths of winter. Unlike religious and cultural festivals, which are ultimately products of the human imagination, the solstices are firmly rooted in the reality of our cosmic situation. Sometimes it’s good to remind ourselves that we live on a spherical rock hurtling around a gigantic nuclear explosion, spinning as it goes.


The Sweet Grass at Sunset. Photo (C) Nomadic Lass

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“Someday a real rain will come…”

Guest Blogger Bike Snob NYC Heads Out Under Cover Of Wetness

9 Jun 2015  |  Posted by Bike Snob NYC  |  Categories: Bicycles, Correspondence, Friends, Monthly highlights, Stories, Travel & Adventure Cycling, Urban Cycling

This past April I took delivery of a brand new saddle:

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Britain Is Brilliant!

Juliet flies the flag for these fair isles

4 Jun 2015  |  Posted by Juliet Elliott  |  Categories: Bicycles, Correspondence, Friends, Monthly highlights, Stories, Travel & Adventure Cycling

I love to explore and the pace of cycling makes it ideal for those seeking pleasure from their region. As I see it, walking is too slow, running doesn’t take you far enough and cars are too fast and too far removed.

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Lands End to John O’Groats in 45 hours and 11 minutes

Dominic Irvine explains what it takes to break a 49 year old record

22 May 2015  |  Posted by GUEST  |  Categories: Bicycles, Correspondence, Friends, Travel & Adventure Cycling

At 3:41am on Thursday 7th May 2015, the rear wheel of our tandem passed over the drain that marked the end point at John O’Groats 45 hours and 11 minutes and 842 miles after leaving Lands End. In so doing, we had broken the 49 year old End to End record that had stood since Swinden and Withers rode the route in 1966 in a time of 50 hours 14 minutes and 25 seconds.

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Multi-Modal Memories

Guest Blogger Bike Snob NYC Time-Trials Into The Past

12 May 2015  |  Posted by Bike Snob NYC  |  Categories: Bicycles, Correspondence, Friends, Monthly highlights, Stories, Travel & Adventure Cycling, Urban Cycling

There are all sorts of reasons to go for a ride.  Sometimes you want to explore, and to mark the world with your tires like your bike is a cat and the road is someone’s pant leg.  Sometimes you want to challenge yourself on that big climb–or, even more pathetically, to challenge complete strangers via some social networking app like Strava.  And sometimes you just wanna get naked.

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Once More Over the Top

Jack Thurston retraces one of the classic pass-storming routes of the inter-war years

6 May 2015  |  Posted by Jack Thurston  |  Categories: Bicycles, Correspondence, Friends, Heritage, Stories, Travel & Adventure Cycling

The West Arms, Llanarmon Dyffryn Ceiriog

The centennial commemorations of the First World War remind us of the origins of the phrase ‘over the top’, now widely used to describe anything extreme or outrageous. The stuttering newsreel shots show young men clambering out of their trenches (‘over the top’) and walking briskly into machine gun fire, barbed wire and almost certain death. With the war not yet a year over, using such a charged phrase ‘over the top’ to describe a bike ride must have been a very deliberate act and that is exactly what Walter MacGregor Robinson did in his celebrated account of a ride across the Berwyn range in north Wales, published in Cycling in May 1919.

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The Beacon Bike

Edward Peppitt explains why he will be visiting many lighthouses

14 Apr 2015  |  Posted by GUEST  |  Categories: Bicycles, Correspondence, Friends, Travel & Adventure Cycling

 

3,500 mile England & Wales lighthouse coastal cycle ride in aid of Shift MS

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From River to Seashore

Guest Blogger Bike Snob NYC Gets Fried

8 Apr 2015  |  Posted by Bike Snob NYC  |  Categories: Bicycles, Correspondence, Curiosities, Friends, Monthly highlights, Travel & Adventure Cycling, Urban Cycling

When you’re a responsible (or at least not criminally negligent) adult it can be tough to make time to ride.  That’s why the secret to maintaining a healthy cycling life is sneaking in those rides when you can–which in turn means knowing when to dispense with the formalities.

Sure, it’s nice to wear the special clothes and brew the special coffee and apply the special unguents to your crotch and limbs in preparation for your time in the saddle, but sometimes doing so can be the difference between taking advantage of an open riding window and having the sash come crashing down on your head while you’re still applying your chamois cream.

On a recent afternoon I had just such a window.  Birds were singing, the sun was shining, and a pie was cooling on the windowsill.   I knew I had to get out there while I had the chance.  So I skipped the riding attire, hastily stuffed a vegan man-purse from Rivendell with some essentials, and decided to take a spin out to City Island, which bills itself as the “Seaport of the Bronx.”

Here’s what I packed as I ran out the door:

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Riding through the lens

Jack Thurston compiles some top tips for photography on the move

19 Mar 2015  |  Posted by Jack Thurston  |  Categories: Art & Design, Bicycles, Correspondence, Friends, Monthly highlights, Travel & Adventure Cycling

“Photography as a fad is well-nigh on its last legs, thanks principally to the bicycle craze.”

So wrote the great Alfred Stieglitz, one of the pioneers of photography, back in 1893. He was wrong of course. Both these novel technologies of the late nineteenth century are still very much with us. And more than that, they seem to go hand in hand.

Throughout that decade cyclists were earlier adopters of Kodak’s new ‘hand camera’. Kodak boss George Eastman himself rode a bike to work and made long sight-seeing cycle tours of Europe. He knew that the last thing cyclists wanted to carry was a hefty tripod and a saddle bag full of heavy glass plates. His company sponsored round-the-world cyclists Thomas Allen and William Sachtleben, who sent back more than 1,200 circular images on 3.5-inch nitrate negatives, a selection of which are currently on display at an exhibition in the Fowler Museum in Los Angeles.

Photographs by Thomas Allen and William Sachtleben

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Chased Around the World by Dogs

Tim Moss tells us cycling around the world is not what you expect

16 Mar 2015  |  Posted by GUEST  |  Categories: Bicycles, Correspondence, Friends, Travel & Adventure Cycling
Life rarely brings what you expect of it. And cycling around the world is no different. How could it be?

From our desks in London, how could we have imagined the places we’d see and the people we’d meet?

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